Contents
1 Tips for falling asleep
Dark and cool - ideal room conditions for healthy sleep Share your bed with your partner, not your smartphone - Blue light as a major cause of problems falling asleep It's all about rhythm - good sleep hygiene with fixed rituals and times Food makes the night - A balanced diet to combat restless sleep No sport, no caffeine, no alcohol - at least not before going to sleep The most important things in a nutshell: You should remember these tips for falling asleep
2 Why is restful sleep important?
Healthy sleep boosts your immune system
3 Healthy sleep vs. poor sleep: benefits and risks summarized
4 Adenosine and melatonin as the body's own sleep triggers
Hormones make it possible - adenosine and melatonin to fall asleep Regenerate, detoxify, tidy up - how healthy sleep restores the body and brain overnight
5 Short and sweet: sleep hormones and processes at a glance
6 What constitutes healthy sleep?
6, 7 or 8 hours - What is the optimal sleep duration? Quality or quantity? What is crucial for restful sleep? What types of sleep are there and what is polyphasic sleep? The four sleep phases Side, stomach or back? What is a healthy sleeping position?
7 Conclusion

We can't concentrate, our performance continues to drop and the statement "I can't sleep" is becoming an unpopular, permanent declaration. According to studies, around 80% of the working population currently state that they sleep too little or not well.1People are often tired in the evening before going to bed, but are unable to sleep. There can be various reasons for problems falling asleep. We'll show you how you can finally sleep better again with a few simple tricks.

Tips for falling asleep

To fall asleep better, you don't have to resort to sleeping pills or counting sheep. It is often enough to change your habits and find a good "sleep hygiene" to develop. Contrary to what the term might suggest, this has nothing to do with hygiene, but rather with the development of "behaviors that promote restful sleep".2 In plain language: If you follow these rules, you will optimize your sleep.

Dark and cool - ideal room conditions for healthy sleep

The darkness and temperature of your bedroom play a major role in getting a good night's sleep. If it is too warm and too bright, you will have trouble falling asleep. Ideal is a room temperature between 16°C and 18°C.3 The bedroom should also be as dark as possible - only in the dark does your brain release the sleep hormone melatonin, which makes you tired and helps you fall asleep.4

Share your bed with your partner, not your smartphone - blue light is a major cause of problems falling asleep

Smartphones, laptops and the like emit so-called blue lightwhich stimulates our body and leads to stay awake sup>7 Alternatively, you can invest your evening technology time in good old books for the sake of your sleep quality.

It's all about rhythm - good sleep hygiene with fixed rituals and times

A key aspect of sleep hygiene is consistent bedtimeswhich should also be adhered to at weekends if possible. You should also really only use your bed for sleepingto associate your bedroom as a place of rest. Watching TV, working and the like are just as counterproductive as staying in bed for long periods at the weekend.7

Food makes the night - A balanced diet to combat restless sleep

Just like a healthy diet can help maintain your performance throughout the day, better eating habits can also help with problems falling asleep. An overly full stomach makes it difficult to fall asleep.

No sport, no caffeine, no alcohol - at least not before going to sleep

Of course, it is important to exercise regularly. Only those who get enough exercise during the day are physically fit and can sleep well at night. However, it is important to note that 11 The same applies to alcohol: although a little "nightcap" is considered by many to help you fall asleep, the alcohol degradation in the body at night leads to insomnia.12

The most important things in a nutshell: You should remember these tips for falling asleep

Healthy sleep stands and falls with good sleep hygiene. This includes:

  • a dark, well-ventilated bedroom with a room temperature between 16°C and 18°C
  • not using technical devices such as smartphones, laptops or televisions before going to bed
  • only use the bed for sleeping
  • Get up and go to bed at regular times
  • No late, heavy meals
  • up a balanced dietespecially magnesium intake
  • Exercise sufficiently during the day and avoid heavy physical activity in the evening
  • Avoid alcohol and caffeine in the evening

Why is restful sleep important?

Along with eating and drinking, sleep is one of our basic human needs. Fulfilling these basic needs is essential for our health and well-being. physical and mental well-being.13 Healthy sleep not only has benefits for our health, but also promotes our performance. This idea is particularly important in the 14

Healthy sleep boosts your immune system

You can literally boost your immune system while you sleep. With good sleep hygiene, your melatonin balance is also right, which, among other things, boosts your immune system. Activates your immune system.15 21 Studies even suggest a link between sleep deprivation and depression sup>22 Those who have had a good night's sleep, on the other hand, are more emotionally balanced and less susceptible to depression. stress.27

Healthy sleep vs. poor sleep: benefits and risks summarized

Benefits of healthy sleep Risks of sleep deprivation and poor sleep
Healthy sleep boosts your immune system Too little sleep weakens your immune system
Healthy sleep helps to burn fat too little sleep leads to weight gain and increases the risk of obesity and overweight
Healthy sleep makes you emotionally balanced and stress-resistant too little sleep makes you moody, sensitive and susceptible to stress; increases the risk of depression
Healthy sleep increases mental and physical performance too little sleep reduces performance and inhibits memory
too little sleep increases the risk of type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, heart attacks and certain cancers

Adenosine and melatonin as the body's own sleep triggers

Why do we sleep?" seems at first to be a very banal question, to which one would probably reflexively answer something like "Because we have to". But what exactly happens in our body and brain when we slip into the realm of dreams?

Hormones make it possible - adenosine and melatonin to fall asleep

Like so many processes in our body, falling asleep is also triggered by hormones. The most important of these is sleep hormone melatonin. The release of melatonin is dependent on daylight and is regulated by the so-called circadian rhythm (= sleep-wake rhythm). As soon as it gets dark, our body releases melatonin and signals that it is time to sleep.28 When we colloquially always talk about our "inner clock", this is not so wrong.

Another of the body's own fatigue makers is adenosine. Unlike melatonin, which is produced in the pineal gland, adenosine is produced in our body cells when a lot of energy is consumed. With continuous activity, the concentration of adenosine in our body increases during the day. By blocking the transmission of stimulating substances such as noradrenaline to the brain, it signals a lack of energy to our body and therefore tiredness. Adenosine is the reason why our urge to sleep is usually greatest in the evening.29

Regenerate, detoxify, tidy up - how healthy sleep gets your body and brain in shape overnight

Contrary to what many people think, our brain is anything but inactive at night. During the various phases of sleep, our brains both tidy up and process what we have experienced during the day. Especially during the Processing, absorbing and storing information sleep plays a central role. You should therefore make sure you get sufficient and restful sleep, especially in times when you are learning a lot (new things).

Especially during the deep sleep phase, the so-called glymphatic system works at full speed to brain and rid it of neurotoxic substancesso that you can think clearly again in the morning.30 Running in parallel in your body regeneration and detoxification processes take place: Cells are renewed and repaired and the release of growth hormones contributes to muscle building and bone maintenance.31

Short and sweet: sleep hormones and processes at a glance

Sleep hormones and their functions
Melatonin The sleep hormone is released at dusk in line with our circadian rhythm and tells our body that it's time for bed
Adenosine Produced in body cells when energy consumption is high and signals fatigue to the body after a lot of activity
Regeneration processes during sleep
Glymphatic system cleanses and detoxifies your brain during deep sleep
Brain processes emotions, information and experiences during the day
Cells in the body are renewed
Growth hormones allow children and adolescents to grow overnight & promote muscle development and bone maintenance in adults

What constitutes healthy sleep?

After talking so much about tips for falling asleep and the benefits of restful sleep, the question naturally arises as to what constitutes healthy sleep in the first place. Is it the healthy sleeping position, the intensity of REM sleep or the duration of sleep?

6, 7 or 8 hours - what is the optimal sleep duration?

If there is an optimal sleep duration, according to scientists, it is for adults between seven and eight hours per night. It is important to note that these values are based on the actual sleep duration not the time we spend in bed. This should be correspondingly longer: Around 7.5 to 8.5 hours, depending on how quickly you fall asleep. You also can't "hack" sleep. "Sleeping faster" does not work.

If we permanently sleep less than seven hours, not only does our physical and mental regeneration suffer,32 but also increase various health risks (see point 2).33 The individual sleep duration varies very strongly depending on age,34 occupation, exercise and physical condition35 Researchers are not yet able to say whether too much sleep is bad for us in the long term.36

Quality or quantity? What is crucial for restful sleep?

Although duration is an important factor, when it comes to healthy sleep, it's not just a case of "it's the quantity that counts". The duration of sleep is the first and most crucial point. However, according to experts, the restorative value and physical well-being also play a sleep quality and regularity play a decisive role37 So you can't shorten your sleep, but you can improve its quality.

You can find out how good the quality of your sleep is by asking yourself, for example: Do you sleep through the night or do you wake up often? Does it take you a long time to fall asleep?38 If you get out of bed in the morning, stretch and think: "I slept well today", this is certainly a good indicator.

What types of sleep are there and what is polyphasic sleep?

Our preferences regarding sleeping times are just as individual as the optimal duration of sleep. In sleep research, a distinction is made here between three sleep typesalso known scientifically as chronotypes: Morning type ("lark"), evening type ("owl") and mixed types. Your personal sleep rhythm depends on genetic, psychological and socio-cultural factors. [sup>39For a restful sleep, you should respect your chronotype. You can test which sleep type you are here. Incidentally, experts advise against trying to outsmart your own sleep rhythm in order to sleep more time-efficiently. This also applies to polyphasic sleepingwhere you divide your sleep phases into smaller chunks throughout the day.40

The four sleep phases

Of the four sleep phases that our body goes through every night, the REM-phase is probably the best known. During rapid eye movement, our body temperature, heart rate and breathing rate increase. Our blood pressure also increases so that our body functions almost as if we were awake, despite the resting phase. During this phase of dreaming, our brain processes everything we have experienced during the day and thus contributes significantly to our mental health and balance.41

While the REM phase is similar to the waking state in terms of physical activity, during the three Non-REM phases (falling asleep phase, light sleep phase and deep sleep phase) down. The regeneration and detoxification of the body and brain, which is important for our health and performance, takes place in the deep sleep phase. During healthy sleep, we switch between the REM and deep sleep phases every 90 minutes after initially passing through the falling asleep and light sleep phases.42 43

Side sleeping position, stomach or back? What is a healthy sleeping position?

If you have trouble falling asleep or have restless sleep, you often change your sleeping position during the night. Sometimes on the side, sometimes on the stomach, sometimes on the back and again from the front. But which sleeping position is best for healthy sleep? The answer is: it depends. While for back, neck and shoulder problems basically the supine position is recommended as a healthy sleeping position, the side position for cleansing the brain at night optimal. This is mainly due to the fact that nerves and blood vessels in the neck are not pinched in this position and toxins can therefore be removed more easily.44

Conclusion

Healthy, restful sleep is essential for health and performance:People who sleep well live healthier lives and are more productive. The decisive factor for falling asleep quickly is a good sleep hygieneRegular bedtimes, avoidance of blue light, caffeine and alcohol in the evening, sufficient exercise during the day and a healthy diet.balanced diet promote healthy sleep.

FAQs: Our answers to the most frequently asked questions about healthy sleep

How can you fall asleep quickly?

To help you fall asleep quickly and easily in the evening, you should choose a good sleep hygiene habits. This includes:

  • going to bed at fixed times
  • not using technical devices such as smartphones or laptops before going to bed
  • make sure your bedroom is well ventilated, cool and dark
  • introduce fixed rituals before going to sleep, such as reading or listening to music
  • A positive start to the day
  • First things first
  • Maximum control over your time
  • Stress reduction
  • Increased productivity & ability to concentrate
  • Improved physical & mental health

How much sleep do I need?

The following sleep duration applies to adults between seven and eight hours per nightHowever, the ideal sleep duration can be influenced by individual factors and may be shorter or longer. It's best to listen to your body when it comes to finding the best sleep duration for you personally. But be careful! Sleep duration is about the time you actually sleep effectively - not how long you are in bed.

What to do if you can't fall asleep?

If you have problems falling asleep, you can try the following tips for falling asleep try them out:

  • do enough sport during the day - avoid in the evening
  • Develop a fixed sleep routine with fixed bedtimes and evening rituals
  • Really only use your bed for sleeping
  • do not consume any drinks containing caffeine or alcohol in the evening
  • do without smartphone & television before going to bed
  • Eat light and little in the evening
  • 30-60 minutes extra
  • Make your morning routine shorter, but stick to it regularly
  • Morning rituals can also be alternated (1-2 per day)

What is sleep?

Scientists are still arguing about how exactly sleep should be defined. To some extent, sleep can be defined as aa state of reduced physical activityin which you are typically in a lying position and in which the body reacts to a lesser extent to external stimuli.45

  • Regular sleep rhythm
  • Consider natural sleep patterns
  • Use a sleep phase alarm clock
  • Set only one alarm clock (no snoozing)

Why is good sleep important?

Good sleep is not only important for a goodhealthbut also for an increasedperformance. When you sleep well, you are more productive, can concentrate better and are less susceptible to stress. Good sleep also makes you more balanced.

What constitutes healthy sleep?

Healthy, restful sleep is good for your body and allows it to regenerate. The criteria for healthy sleep include

  • an appropriate sleep duration of between seven and eight hours
  • a healthy sleeping position that avoids tension
  • full deep sleep and REM phases
  • sleep through the night
  • respecting your personal sleep rhythm.

How can I improve the quality of my sleep?

There are several things you can do to make your sleep more restful:

  • make sure you during the day enough exerciseso that you are really tired in the evening and sleep well through the night
  • make sure that your dark, quiet and cool in your bedroom is
  • Before going to bed, try to clear your head
  • respect the natural sleep rhythm of your body
  • find your optimal sleeping position

What happens in our body during sleep?

Contrary to what has long been assumed, our body is extremely active during sleep. Depending on the sleep phase, our vital functions are shut down. However, this only happens so that our body can fully concentrate on theregenerationour cells and theremoval of toxinscan concentrate.

What happens in our brain during sleep?

Just like our body, the brain also uses the sleep phase to do a little housecleaning. During the deep sleep phasecleanses and detoxifiesthe glymphatic system cleanses your brain. During the REM phase, on the other hand, your brain runs at full speed cognitively in order to process everything.process everything you have experienced during the day. This is particularly important forlearning and memory processesa decisive role.

Sbalitelný obsah

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